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Twin Spindle Lathes

Twin Spindle Lathes

There is a lot of different terminology in the marketplace these days when it comes to lathes that have two spindles, the initial step when purchasing often has to do with simply understanding those slight differences. The sub spindle, twin spindle lathes, dual spindle, main spindle, and secondary spindle – these are all terms used to describe the spindle architecture inside a machine. Manufacturers of machine tools will apply this kind of terminology in various ways, which depends slightly on the component setup and partly on singular choice. The main spindle is the main working spindle of the lathe. In a twin spindle lathes setup on a CNC lathe, both spindles normally are identical in the specifics and capabilities. In terms of two-spindle machines, one style, the spindles face each other, and the second style they don’t. The second kind may require either a manual or gantry-style loading system.

The productivity, price per part, back-working capability and the high quality of twin spindle lathes can all be positively influenced by increasing a turning centre with a second spindle to your workplace. Twin spindle lathes increase the productivity by lowering the part handling by automatically transferring the parts from one to another for secondary operations. In order to enhance the productivity, the twin spindle lathes combined with robotic part feeding and extraction, or with bar feeders for lengthy, unattended part runs. The price per part is able to be lowered due to the fact that the part no longer sits idly, waiting for a secondary operation to be performed. The secondary spindle is able to be programmed to approach the part and remove it from the central chuck, providing the back-work machining.

Compared to others, the twin spindle lathes has the addition of a second spindle to the work envelope affects part programming when referring to complexity and key attention is required in some instances. In twin spindle lathes the rotation of the spindle and the toolpath direction are reversed, so the Z axis is able to be programmed in positive numbers as opposed to negative from part zero.